The LeapFrog Leapster Explorer Review

Posted on Feb 15 2011 - 11:55pm by Richard Sharp

Back in the old days, didactic toys had, at best, a squeaky head, a part that rustled and some beads to count. Now future computer geeks and techies can use the LeapFrog Leapster Explorer to make to take their first tentative steps in the world of computing. It is designed for kids over the age of 4.


Overall Design

This very modern learning tool and toy is a joy to look at and comes packed with features to help your little ones learn and have fun at the same time. This is a toy / minicomputer / hand held gaming device / learning centre which can grow with your child and teach them as they play.

The interface and touch screen are as easy to operate as you would expect in something aimed at youngsters, and the clear, simple display is ideal for the age group it has been designed for. It also comes with a stylus, to let the little users practice their writing and drawing skills.

The design appears to be sturdy enough to cope with a bit of boisterous play and the occasional drop to the ground, or even being smothered in jam by sticky little hands.

Games and Activities

Probably one of the first things your child will head for is the games section, and here you will find that it comes with some basic stuff but that you will also want to buy some of the games and activities apps which are available to buy. There are around 40 of these at the moment. Some are cartridge games while others are downloadable apps which you can get from the manufacturer’s site.

Another option is to use the LeapWorld facility. This is an online option which allows users to let their imagination run wild and create their own world. Apart from this, you can download free stuff from the LeapFrog site by connecting the device to your PC through the USB cable which comes with it.

The options are really too extensive to go into them all in much detail but learning art, reading, writing, music, geography, spelling and encouraging the youngster to use their imagination are among things which can be gained from this little computer.

When you first connect the Explorer to your PC you will be prompted to set up a parental account, and from here you can find out how your child is doing anytime you connect it to you computer in the future. This clever section lets you see their best and worst subjects and can include profiles and stats for a maximum of 3 kids.

Cost of the Device and Software  

The device itself costs around £60 while 20 pounds is the most common price for the software. Games are generally based around popular characters such as the Penguins from Madagascar, the Toy Story guys and SpongeBob.  There is also a camera accessory which costs a little less and lets the machine become a camera / camcorder and photographic studio.

Could this be your child’s first little computer? Get it for £59.99 with free delivery from Amazon

About the Author

Richard Sharp is the founder of gadgetsandgizmos.org. He loves technology, gadgets (comes with the territory) and social media. You'll find him writing features, attending events and playing with cool tech. Life's good.

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